Where is the uterus and what does it do?

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diagram of female reproductive system

diagram of female reproductive system

female reproductive system in context with the rest of the body

female reproductive system in context with the rest of the body

The uterus (womb) is found in the female pelvis above the vagina and is where a woman's fertilised egg develops into a baby.

Each month,  from puberty until the menopause, one of the ovaries releases an egg, which travels down one of the fallopian tubes to the uterus.

If the egg isn’t fertilised, the thickened lining of the uterus breaks down and leaves the body. This is what is happening when a woman has her monthly period.

The wall of the uterus is made of a thick layer of muscle called the myometrium. The lining of the inside of the uterus is called the endometrium. Most uterine cancers start in this lining.

The entrance to the uterus is called the cervix. A different type of cancer (cervical cancer) can start here. The cervix leads from the uterus (womb) to vagina (birth canal) connecting the uterus to the outside of the body.




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